Makemake Has A Tiny Moon

Hubble has made yet another fascinating discovery. This time it is a miniscule moon orbiting the dwarf planet Makemake.

Makemake, which is named after the creator god of Easter Island’s Rapa Nui people, was discovered in 2005. It is beyond the orbit of Neptune in the Kuiper Belt and even though it is farther away from the sun than Pluto, it is the second brightest Kuiper belt object. Makemake, with a 870 miles diameter, is believed to be the third largest dwarf planet after Pluto and Eris.

When processing its images from Hubble, astronomers were able to separate the moon from Makemake’s glare. Temporarily named MK2, the moon is a faint object. It is tiny too about 100 miles across.

Isn’t it impressive how much Hubble is still able to discover at a ripe old age of 26?

S.G. Basu is an aspiring potentate of a galaxy or two. She plots and plans with wondrous machines, cybernetic robots, time travelers and telekinetic adventurers, some of whom escape into the pages of her books. Once upon a previous life on planet Earth, S.G. Basu trained to be an engineer, and her interest in science and her love of engineering shows up time and again in her books.

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Posted in astronomy, science news

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